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DPC annual Picnic and potluck 25th Dec 2016

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Hi, Here we present the annual Picnic and potluck as part of Last heritage Photowalk of year 2016  at Lodhi Garden on 25th Dec 2017 from 2.30 pm onwards

All are invited

Please note:

1- A return mail from our side confirming your participation will be sent.
2-The Picnic and Potluck is on Sunday 25th December at Lodhi Garden at 2.30 pm, and will end at 6.30 pm.
3-We will end the picnic with the heritage walk at the last monument near the water body.
 
Ways to reach:
By metro: The nearest metro station is Jor Bagh. Take an auto from there to reach the Lodhi Garden, gate no. 1.
By car: You can park the car at the Lodhi Garden, gate no. 1 or on the opposite side of the garden.
 

Kindly note

5-There is no charge for anything else. However, we are expecting a gathering of 25-30 people. so please feel free to bring your contribution(only food articles).

6-Any sort of soliciting or promoting any product or service among the photowalkers is a strict NO. These photowalks are to encourage amateur photographers and beginners to come out and enjoy photography, please help us maintain the spirit.
7-Some people want to help us. There are two ways,
a-tell about the club to as many of your friends as possible and ask them to join us either on the Facebook page (look for Delhi Photography Club, non-profit organization)   when you search on Facebook
b-send us photos clicked in the walk so that we may upload them in the club’s album
8-Please bring your water bottles, shades, and wear comfortable shoes as it will be hot and sunny. 
9- Please send 10-15 photos zipped and compressed to virendra@delhiphotographyclub.com after the walk for submission to DPC facebook album.

 

Lets enjoy the year closing in style.

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DPC Pune Heritage Photowalk Pashan lake 3rd Dec 2016

p1020374DPC Pune Chapter announces next photo walk at Pashan Lake.  3rd Dec Saturday 

Pashan lake is a manmade lake, built by bunding a small rivulet (Ramnadi). The rivulet originates from Bavdhan and flows via Pashan, SutarwadiBaner to Someshwarwadi before flowing into the main Mula river.The total catchment area is 40 square kilometres (15 sq mi). Lake served as a source of water to old Pashan village, for growing crops all the year round and to nearby Governor’s house. Lake and its surrounding area attracts migratory birds and so is popular spot for bird watchersPune Municipal Corporation (PMC) has constructed a 300-metre footpath called the nature trail alongside the lake. It is constructed along the western shore of Pashan lake. Also, PMC has built a bamboo plantation and wall alongside the lake to protect it and attract birds. Within municipal limits of Pune city, Pashan has the maximum hill area of 5111.89 hectors (excluding 23 fringe villages). 

Date :  3rd December 2016. 

 The photo walk will start from the main gate of the Pashan Lake complex at 6.45 am. 

 Participants should reach the venue at least 5 minutes before the start if they want to see and capture the sunrise which is enerally around 6.45-6.50 am.

Activity open to all. 

Please Note : if you register and confirm that you will be attending and do not turn up, you have denied someone as enthusiastic as you, a chance of the walk. Therefore, please register and confirm only if you are reasonably certain to make it on the day :)

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DPC Heritage Photowalk : Red Fort (3rd and 4th Dec 2016)

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Red Fort

In 1638 Shahjahan transferred his capital from Agra to Delhi and laid the foundations of Shahjahanabad, the seventh city of Delhi. It is enclosed by a rubble stone wall, with bastions, gates and wickets at intervals. Of its fourteen gates, the important ones are the Mori, Lahori, Ajmeri, Turkman, Kashmiri and Delhi gates, some of which have already been demolished. His famous citadel, the Lal-Qila, or the Red Fort, lying at the town’s northern end on the right bank or the Yamuna and south of Salimgarh, was begun in 1639 and completed after nine years. The Red Fort is different from the Agra fort and is better planned, because at its back lies the experience gained by Shahjahan at Agra, and because it was the work of one hand. It is an irregular octagon, with two long sides on the east and west, and with two main gates, one on the west and the other on the south, called Lahori and Delhi gates respectively. While the walls, gates and a few other structures in the fort are constructed of red sandstone, marble has been largely used in the palaces.

From the western gateway after passing through the vaulted arcade, called Chhatta-Chowk, one reaches the Naubat- or Naqqar-Khana (‘Drum-house’), where ceremonial music was played and which also served as the entrance to the Diwan-i-‘Am. Its upper storey is now occupied by the Indian War Memorial Museum.

The Diwan-i-‘ Am (‘Hall of Public Audience’) is a rectangular hall, three aisle deep, with a façade of nine arches. At the back of the hall is an alcove, where the royal throne stood under a marble canopy, with an inlaid marble dias below it for the prime minister. The wall behind the throne is ornamented with beautiful panels of pietra dura work, said to have been executed by Austin de Bordeaux, a Florentine artist. Orpheus with his lute is represented in one of the panels here. Originally there were six marble palaces along the eastern water front. Behind the Diwan-i-‘ Am but separated by a court is the Rang-Mahal (‘Painted Palace’), so called owing to coloured decoration on its interior. It consists of a main hall with an arched front, with vaulted chambers on either end. A water-channel, called the Nahr-i-Bihisht (‘Stream of Paradise’), ran down through it, with a central marble basin fitted with an ivory fountain. The Mumtaz-Mahal, originally an important apartment in the imperial seraglio, now houses the Delhi Fort Museum.

The Diwan-i-Khass (‘Hall of Private Audience’) is a highly-ornamented pillared hall, with a flat ceiling supported on engrailed arches. The lower portion of its piers is ornamented with floral pietra dura panels, while the upper portion was originally gilded and painted. Its marble dias is said to have supported the famous Peacock Throne, carried away by the Persian invader Nadir Shah.

The Tasbih-Khana (‘chamber for counting beads for private prayers’) consists of three rooms, behind which is the Khwabgah (‘sleeping-chamber’). On the northern screen of the former is a representation of the Scales of Justice, which are suspended over a crescent amidst stars and clouds. Adjoining the eastern wall of the Khwabgah is the octagonal Muthamman-Burj, from where the emperor appeared before his subjects every morning. A small balcony, which projects from the Burj, was added here in 1808 by Akbar Shah II, and it was from this balcony that King George V and Queen Mary appeared before the people of Delhi in December 1911.

The Hammam (‘Bath’) consists of three main apartments divided by corridors. The entire interior, including the floor, is built of marble and inlaid with coloured stones. The baths were provided with ‘hot and cold water’, and it is said that one of the fountains in the easternmost apartment emitted rose water. To the west of the Hammam is the Moti-Masjid (‘Pearl Mosque’), added later by Aurangzeb. The Hayat-Bakhsh-Bagh (‘Life-giving garden’), with its pavilions, lies to the north of the mosque, and was later considerably altered and reconstructed. The red-stone pavilion in the middle of the tank in the centre of the Hayat-Bakhsh-Bagh is called Zafar-Mahal and was built by Bahadur Shah II in about 1842.

In 1644, Shahjahan commenced in Delhi his great mosque, the Jami’- Masjid the largest mosque in India, and completed it in 1650. Its square quadrangle with arched cloisters on the sides and a tank in the centre is 100 m. wide. Built on a raised plinth, it has three imposing gateways approached by long flights of steps. Its prayer-hall, with a facade of eleven arches, flanked by a four-storeyed minaret on either end, is covered by three large domes ornamented with alternating stripes of ‘black and white marble.

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DPC Heritage Photowalk potters village

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DPC Heritage Photowalk to Potters Village
The potters of this village rely solely on their craft for their livelihood. You can appreciate the sharp contrast between the urban and rural parts of Delhi. Observe the daily activities and rituals of the locals. Our guide will also help you to strike a conversation with the potter community. Try your hand at the potter’s wheel. Kids playing some traditional Indian games in narrow streets make for a good camera-shot. And don’t forget to take back some memories, they have a small souvenir shop as well.

Cultural interaction with the potters
Observing different types of pottery processes
Traditional Indian pottery
Ofcourse you can buy
How to Reach
Nearest metro station is Uttam Nagar

Note:

We accept 60 people for the walk (to better manage the logisitcs and have a small group for the walk leader). 2 days prior to the walk you will get a admin mail containing all the details of the walk.

To register www.delhiphotographyclub.com/regsiter

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DPC announces call for entries for season 6

Finally the wait is over. DPC invites entries from all the photography enthusiast for its annual exhibition Nicefoto season 6 : an international celebration of Amateur Photography .

Its Free , No charges for anyone. Submit unto 10 photos , Images needs to be less then 1.5 mb per image. Share with your friends

Nicefoto season 6 will be bigger and better . Create your gallery now @www.nicefoto.in Last date of entries 05th Oct 2016 .

Exhibition date : 21st Oct onwards at India Habitat Center , N Delhi

If case of any query write to virendra@delhiphotographyclub.com

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DPC Literati IIT Delhi Photowalk 24th Sep

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DPC presents exclusive photowalk with Literati IIT Delhi on 24th Sep 2016.

Delhi Photography Club invites you for a heritage photowalk to the The Durga Idol Making, at Chittranjan Park, on 24th Sep, Saturday. The walk will start at 10.00 am and will end at 12.00 pm.

​How to reach there:

By Metro : Nearest station – Nehru Place and/or Hauz Khas

Auto/Cab : please reach at Kalibari Temple, Chitranjan Park Near market no 4

See you there at 10.00 am at Kalibari Temple, Chitranjan Park Near market no 4

About Delhi Photography Club
Delhi Photography Club was setup with the intent of taking photography homes. The purpose of the DPC is to stimulate, enable, and nurture a fraternity of photography enthusiasts for mutual benefit.

Due to fast changing internet and mobile devices space, many more people are consuming photos. We want people to store their memories more beautifully. The club is perhaps the first initiative of this kind in the entire country.

To offer situations to practice photography, we do free photo walks every month. For learning the technique, we have workshops for various levels (beginner and intermediate), for motivation, we offer memberships and finally for platform, we have these exhibitions. The club also helps the underserved children to express themselves creatively through its outreach activities.

As a club, we have brought together businessmen, diplomats, doctors, lawyers, homemakers, students and children and helped them in their creative expression using a camera.

About Literati IIT Delhi

The vision of IIT Delhi academia extends beyond the realm of technical expertise and is also aimed at promoting holistic excellence. As a part of this effort, we, the Board for Student Publications, the publication and journalistic body of IIT Delhi, organise Literati, an annual literary extravaganza. Through this fest, we aim to provide a platform to the students to explore and experience various facades of the enthralling world of literature as well as encourage expression through spoken and written word.

The three day fest boasts of a plethora of events like seminars, workshops, panel discussions, interactive sessions with speakers, online and offline competitive events and everything a literary enthusiast could hope for. The fest is scheduled for September 23 to 24 this year.